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Classes

Physical Science
1.00 Credit

Physical Science (1.0 Required)
This course is designed as an interactive, 21st century course focusing on basic physics and chemistry. Topics include forces and motion, energy through waves, electricity and magnetism, the matter around us, chemical bonding and reactions. This course is designed to serve as a foundation for the study of the physical sciences. The utilization of scientific inquiry, web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher order thinking, collaborative projects, real world application through labs and a variety of assessments all aid the student in ultimately demonstrating a vast understanding of the importance of the physical and chemical properties of the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives.

Biology
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Physical Science

Biology (1.0 Required)
The Biology course guides students through the study of living and non-living systems and how they interact with one another. Students explore the world they live in by posing questions and seeking answers through scientific inquiry. Discovery takes place through observation and data collection. The students will be introduced to the structure, function, diversity, and evolution of living matter. This is a course with real relevance. It encourages curiosity and provides opportunity for students to work on hands on lab activities and develop relationships through collaboratively learning. Engaging in the study of biological science broadens the picture of the world around us.

Chemistry
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Physical Science and Biology

Chemistry I and Chemistry I Honors are rigorous and not intended for credit recovery. Students will be challenged and need to have 6-10 hours per week designated to be successful. It is designed as an interactive, 21st century course focusing on Chemistry. Topics include the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter and their applications. This course is designed to serve as a foundation for the study of Chemistry. The utilization of scientific inquiry, web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher order thinking, collaborative projects, real world application through labs and a variety of assessments all aid the student in ultimately demonstrating a vast understanding of the importance of Chemistry in the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives.

Physics
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Physical Scicence and Biology

In each module of Physics I, students discover the contributions of scientific geniuses like Galileo, Newton, and Einstein. Through their work, students learn the concepts, theories, and laws that govern the interaction of matter, energy, and forces. From tiny atoms to galaxies with millions of stars, the universal laws of physics are explained through real-world examples. Using laboratory activities, videos, software, and websites, students follow in the footsteps of some of the world's greatest thinkers.

Anatomy and Physiology
0.50 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Physical Science and Biology

In this course students will explore the anatomy or structure of the human body. In addition to learning anatomical terminology, students will study and the main systems of the body--including integumentary (the integumentary system is the organ system that protects the body from various kinds of damage, such as loss of water or abrasion from outside.), skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, and nervous systems. In addition to identifying the bones, muscles, and organs, students will study the structure of cells and tissues within the body.

Astronomy: Exploring the Universe
0.50 Credit

Why do stars twinkle? Is it possible to fall into a black hole? Will the sun ever stop shining? Since the first glimpse of the night sky, humans have been fascinated with the stars, planets, and universe that surrounds us. This course will introduce students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development, basic scientific laws of motion and gravity, the concepts of modern astronomy, and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and the sun and stars. Using online tools, students will examine the life cycle of stars, the properties of planets, and the exploration of space.

Forensic Science
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Physical Science and Biology

Fingerprints. Blood spatter. DNA analysis. The world of law enforcement is increasingly making use of the techniques and knowledge from the sciences to better understand the crimes that are committed and to catch those individuals responsible for the crimes. Forensic science applies scientific knowledge to the criminal justice system. This course focuses on some of the techniques and practices used by forensic scientists during a crime scene investigation (CSI). Starting with how clues and data are recorded and preserved, the student will follow evidence trails until the CSI goes to trial, examining how various elements of the crime scene are analyzed and processed.

Marine Science
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Physical Science and Biology

As our amazing planet continues to change over time, it becomes increasingly apparent how human activity has made environmental impacts. In the marine science course, students will delve deep into Earth?s bodies of water and study geologic structures and how they impact the oceans. Students will investigate characteristics of various populations, patterns of distribution of life in our aquatic systems, and ongoing changes occurring every day in our precious ecosystems. Students will be amazed and enlightened at just how much our oceans and lakes affect climate, weather, and seasonal variations. They will have the opportunity to explore the relationships among living organisms and see how they are affected by our oceans currents, tides, and waves. Hold on, it is one amazing journey.

Veterinary Science: The Care of Animals
0.50 Credit

As animals play an increasingly important role in our lives, scientists have sought to learn more about their health and well-being. Taking a look at the pets that live in our homes, on our farms, and in zoos and wildlife sanctuaries, this course will examine some of the common diseases and trea'ents for domestic animals. Toxins, parasites, and infectious diseases impact not only the animals around us, but at times?we humans as well! Through veterinary medicine and science, the prevention and trea'ent of diseases and health issues is studied and applied.

AP Biology
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Biology and Chemistry

Given the speed with which scientific discoveries and research
continuously expand scientific knowledge, many educators are faced with
the challenge of balancing breadth of content coverage with depth of
understanding.
The revised AP® Biology course addresses this challenge by shifting from a
traditional “content coverage” model of instruction to one that focuses on
enduring, conceptual understandings and the content that supports them.
This approach will enable students to spend less time on factual recall
and more time on inquiry-based learning of essential concepts, and will
help them develop the reasoning skills necessary to engage in the science
practices used throughout their study of AP Biology.
To foster this deeper level of learning, the breadth of content coverage
in AP Biology is defined in a way that distinguishes content essential
to support the enduring understandings from the many examples or
applications that can overburden the course. Illustrative examples are
provided that offer teachers a variety of optional instructional contexts to
help their students achieve deeper understanding. Additionally, content
that is outside the scope of the course and exam is also identified.
Students who take an AP Biology course designed using this curriculum
framework as its foundation will also develop advanced inquiry and
reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing
data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and
across domains. The result will be readiness for the study of advanced
topics in subsequent college courses — a goal of every AP course.
The revised AP Biology course is equivalent to a two-semester college
introductory biology course and has been endorsed enthusiastically by
higher education officials. The prerequisites for AP Biology are high school
courses in biology and chemistry.

AP Environmental Science
1.00 Credit

The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science. Unlike most other introductory-level college science courses, environmental science is offered from a wide variety of departments, including geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography. The AP Environmental Science course has been developed to be intended to enable students to undertake, as first-year college students, a more advanced study of topics in environmental science.

Honors Chemistry
1.00 Credit

Chemistry I and Chemistry I Honors are rigorous and not intended for credit recovery. Students will be challenged and need to have 6-10 hours per week designated to be successful. It is designed as an interactive, 21st century course focusing on Chemistry. Topics include the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter and their applications. This course is designed to serve as a foundation for the study of Chemistry. The utilization of scientific inquiry, web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher order thinking, collaborative projects, real world application through labs and a variety of assessments all aid the student in ultimately demonstrating a vast understanding of the importance of Chemistry in the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives.

American Government
0.50 Credit

American Government - (Required of all graduating students)
Students will learn responsible citizenship, including civil and political participation is essential to maintain a representative government that truly represents the people of the United States. In this course, students learn about the structure of government and how it shares power at the local, state and federal levels. This course also explores founding principles that inspired the Constitution and Bill of Rights, preserving the freedoms that students experience daily. Students will examine the processes of each branch of government, the election process, and how citizens can impact public policy. The media, interest groups and influential citizens provide examples of how the government can be effected by informed and active participants. Students will examine the U.S. Court system, and become a part of the process by participating in the judicial decision making process. They will also discover ways the United States interacts with countries around the world, through domestic policy, foreign policy and human rights policy.

US History
1.00 Credit

American History (Required 1.0 credit to graduate)
This class is full of big questions that grab our attention. In this course, you will look at some of the most profound questions that thoughtful Americans still debate. You will research many important events throughout the history of America. In the process, you will witness the development of America from its first settlers to today?s superpower status. Questions about slavery, regulation of business, religious freedom, and how to maintain a stable world order have always been part of the American experiment. Most of the time, the answers are not so simple, but we want to know what you think. To develop your personal beliefs, you will use verified sources, including original documents and the writings of people contemporary with the events. Equally important, this course will challenge you to apply your knowledge and perspective of history to interpret the events of today. The questions raised by history are endlessly fascinating. We look forward to your participation in the debate.

Anthropology
0.50 Credit

Introduction to Anthropology: Uncovering Human Mysteries Course Syllabus

Course Description:
"Anthropology demands the open-mindedness with which one must look and listen, record in astonishment and wonder that which one would not have been able to guess." (Margaret Mead)

The aim of anthropology is to use a broad approach to gain an understanding of our past, present, future and address the problems humans face in biological, social and cultural life. This course will explore the evolution, similarity and diversity of humankind through time. It will look at how we have evolved from a biologically and culturally weak species to one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the world will also be presented in the course.

Archaeology: Detectives of the Past
0.50 Credit

George Santayana once said, Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. The field of archeology helps us to better understand the events and societies of the past that have helped to shape our modern world. This course focuses on this techniques, methods, and theories that guide the study of the past. Students will learn how archaeological research is conducted and interpreted, as well as how artifacts are located and preserved. Finally, students will learn about the relationship of material items to culture and what we can learn about past societies from these items.

Criminology
0.50 Credit

In today’s society, crime and deviant behavior are often one of the top concerns of society members. From the nightly news to personal experiences with victimization, crime seems to be all around us. In this course, we will explore the field of criminology or the study of crime. In doing so, we will look at possible explanations for crime from psychological, biological, and sociological standpoints, explore the various types of crime and their consequences for society, and investigate how crime and criminals are handled by the criminal justice system. Why do some individuals commit crimes but others don’t? What aspects in our culture and society promote crime and deviance? Why do individuals receive different punishments for the same crime? What factors shape the criminal case process, from arrest to punishments?

Economics
0.50 Credit

Economic decisions affect us every day of our lives. Understanding economics means thinking about how scarcity, or limited resources, requires us to make choices and evaluate one option against others. In this course, you will recognize examples of economics in your daily life. You will see how the economic choices of larger groups, like businesses and governments, affect you and others. As you progress through the course, you will recognize that the costs and benefits of choices connect individuals and groups around the world.

The purpose of this course is to help you become a smart consumer who understands the flow of an economy between individuals, businesses, governments, and the rest of the world.

Human Geography: Our Global Identity
0.50 Credit

How do language, religion, and landscape affect the physical environment? How do geography, weather, and location affect customs and lifestyle? Students will explore the diverse ways in which people affect the world around them and how they are affected by their surroundings. Students will discover how ideas spread and cultures form, and learn how beliefs and architecture are part of a larger culture complex. In addition to introducing students to the field of Human Geography, this course will teach students how to analyze humans and their environments.

Law and Order: Introduction to Legal Studies
0.50 Credit

Every purchase, lease, contract, marriage, divorce, arrest, crime or traffic violation places the citizen face-to-face with the law. Law & Order is designed to provide students with an understanding of their legal rights and responsibilities.

Personal Psychology: The Road to Self-Discovery
0.50 Credit

Self-knowledge is the key to self-improvement! Psychology is a subject that can be applied to everyday life. New research and ideas will change the way we view ourselves and each other. This course offers exciting online psychology experiments about our own behavior and how we behave with other people.

Rules of War
0.50 Credit

This course is an educational program that introduces students to international humanitarian law. The learning materials are based on both historical and contemporary situations, show how IHL aims to protect life and human dignity during armed conflict and to prevent and reduce the suffering and devastation caused by war. In this class students will be required to play an active role in the learning process, enabling them to develop a humanitarian perspective and to understanding what IHL is all about.
The Rules of War will examine the devastation caused by war by making use of case studies and by building upon students’ own experiences and ways of thinking. The case studies describe the behavior of actual people who are caught in situations where humanitarian action is required. By studying these situations, students develop a new perspective and begin to understand the need for rules to protect life and human dignity during war.

Sociology
1.00 Credit

In this class, students study about an increasingly globalized world, and how it is important to recognize how group behavior impacts both the individual and society. The study of sociology allows us to understand how social relationships affect a person's behavior and how societies evolve as a result. By studying groups in society such as families, organizations, governments, and schools, we can see how societies change over time. This gives us a greater awareness of the beliefs, values, and behavior patterns of others. In this course, you will examine the social structure and culture of society. You will also investigate some of the issues and problems in societies such as crime, poverty, discrimination, racism, and sexism. Learning about the measures that societies use to influence group behavior helps us to understand how societies prevent deviance from group norms. In addition to learning about social relationships and group behaviors, you will be challenged to apply this understanding to your own society. By interviewing, analyzing, and reporting on group behavior in your own community, you will gain a better understanding of your community and your involvement in society. Although solving problems in society is difficult, your participation and analysis of your community will help you gain a better understanding of how people interact with each other in societies.

Sociology 2
0.50 Credit

In an increasingly globalized world, it is important to recognize how group behavior impacts both the individual and society. The study of sociology allows us to understand how social relationships affect a person's behavior and how societies evolve as a result. By studying groups in society such as families, organizations, governments, and schools, we can see how societies change over time. This gives us a greater awareness of the beliefs, values, and behavior patterns of others. In this course, you will examine the social structure and culture of society. You will also investigate some of the issues and problems in societies such as crime, poverty, discrimination, racism, and sexism. Learning about the measures that societies use to influence group behavior helps us to understand how societies prevent deviance from group norms. In addition to learning about social relationships and group behaviors, you will be challenged to apply this understanding to your own society. By interviewing, analyzing, and reporting on group behavior in your own community, you will gain a better understanding of your community and your involvement in society. Although solving problems in society is difficult, your participation and analysis of your community will help you gain a better understanding of how people interact with each other in societies.

World History
1.00 Credit

How did we get to where we are today? Join Ali and Soo-jin, our modern time travelers, as they journey through World History to take you on an adventure as you discover the interconnectedness of world events and eras. Grab your passport for the adventure of a lifetime.

In Segment I, students will learn how the Roman Empire developed in two very distinct directions. Next, students will discover the great intellectual and cultural contributions of Islamic Empires. Journey through the Middle Ages of Europe and Japan to learn how knights and samurais lived. You will also investigate the rise and fall of some of the great kingdoms of the Americas and Africa and then travel back to the Europe of the Renaissance and Reformation era. Hang on tight, before you dive into the Age of Discovery when eastern and western hemispheric encounters created for some turbulent times.

Segment II begins with a bang as students will learn about advancements in science and thought during the Age of Enlightenment and the social and political revolutions that followed as a result. As students meander through the 19th century, they will learn about the transformation from an agricultural to an industrial world and the many changes that resulted from that shift. Students will then learn about the interconnectedness of nationalism and colonialism and the two massive world wars were the end result. As students approach the finish line, they will learn about development in our modern world and the implications that historical events have on us today.

World Religions: Exploring Diversity
0.50 Credit

Throughout the ages, religions from around the world have shaped the political, social, and cultural aspects of societies. This course focuses on the major religions that have played a role in human history, including Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, and Taosim. Students will trace the major developments in these religions and explore their relationships with social institutions and culture. The course will also discuss some of the similarities and differences among the major religions and examine the connections and influences they have.

AP Art History
1.00 Credit

The AP Art History course explores such topics as the nature of art, its uses, its meanings, art making, and responses to art. Through investigation of diverse artistic traditions of cultures from prehistory to the present, the course fosters in-depth and holistic understanding of the history of art from a global perspective. Students learn and apply skills of visual, contextual, and comparative analysis to engage with a variety of art forms, constructing understanding of individual works and interconnections of art-making processes and products throughout history.

AP European History
1.00 Credit

The AP European History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of European history from approximately 1450 to the present. The course has students investigate the content of European history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in four historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides five themes (interaction of Europe and the world; poverty and prosperity; objective knowledge and subjective visions; states and other institutions of power; and individual and society) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places.

AP Human Geography
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Students should be able to read college-level texts and apply the conventions of Standard Written English in their writing.

The AP Human Geography course is equivalent to an introductory
college-level course in human geography. The course introduces
students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that
have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s
surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis
to examine socioeconomic organization and its environmental
consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools
geographers use in their research and applications. The curriculum
reflects the goals of the National Geography Standards (2012)

AP Macroeconomics
0.50 Credit

AP Macroeconomics is an introductory college-level course that
focuses on the principles that apply to an economic system as
a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of
national income and price-level determination; it also develops
students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the
financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and
international economics. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and
data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts

AP Microeconomics
0.50 Credit

AP Microeconomics is an introductory college-level course that
focuses on the principles of economics that apply to the functions
of individual economic decision-makers. The course also develops
students’ familiarity with the operation of product and factor
markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of
government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the
economy. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze,
describe, and explain economic concepts.

AP Psychology
0.50 Credit

The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic
and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes.
While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped
the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key
concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the
biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning
and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and
individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social
psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological
research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the
scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence, and
effectively communicate ideas

AP United States History
1.00 Credit

The AP U.S. History course focuses on the development of historical
thinking skills (chronological reasoning, comparing and contexualizing,
crafting historical arguments using historical evidence, and interpreting
and synthesizing historical narrative) and the development of students’
abilities to think conceptually about U.S. history from approximately
1491 to the present. Seven themes of equal importance – American
and National Identity; Migration and Settlement; Politics and Power;
Work, Exchange, and Technology; America in the World; Geography and
the Environment; and Culture and Society – provide areas of historical
inquiry for investigation throughout the course. These require students
to reason historically about continuity and change over time and make
comparisons among various historical developments in different times
and places. The course also allows teachers flexibility across nine
different periods of U.S. history to teach topics of their choice in depth.

AP US Government and Politics
0.50 Credit

AP United States Government and Politics introduces students to
key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and
behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States.
The course examines politically significant concepts and themes,
through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning assess
causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to
develop evidence-based argument.

AP World History
1.00 Credit

The AP World History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of the world history from approximately 8000 BCE to the present. This college-level course has students investigate the content of world history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides five themes (interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; development and transformation of social structures) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places encompassing the five major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania.

Honors American Government
0.50 Credit

Students will learn responsible citizenship, including civil and political participation is essential to maintain a representative government that truly represents the people of the United States. In this course, students learn about the structure of government and how it shares power at the local, state and federal levels. This course also explores founding principles that inspired the Constitution and Bill of Rights, preserving the freedoms that students experience daily. Students will examine the processes of each branch of government, the election process, and how citizens can impact public policy. The media, interest groups and influential citizens provide examples of how the government can be effected by informed and active participants. Students will examine the U.S. Court system, and become a part of the process by participating in the judicial decision making process. They will also discover ways the United States interacts with countries around the world, through domestic policy, foreign policy and human rights policy.

Honors US History
1.00 Credit

This class is full of big questions that grab our attention. In this course, you will look at some of the most profound questions that thoughtful Americans still debate. You will research many important events throughout the history of America. In the process, you will witness the development of America from its first settlers to today?s superpower status. Questions about slavery, regulation of business, religious freedom, and how to maintain a stable world order have always been part of the American experiment. Most of the time, the answers are not so simple, but we want to know what you think. To develop your personal beliefs, you will use verified sources, including original documents and the writings of people contemporary with the events. Equally important, this course will challenge you to apply your knowledge and perspective of history to interpret the events of today. The questions raised by history are endlessly fascinating.

English I
1.00 Credit

Join us in English I for a journey. In each unit of the course, we embark on a new journey. Through the study of literature, nonfiction, and life, we will explore the unknown, search for identity and equality, and seek achievement, opportunity, and understanding. You will read to analyze the way language is used to express human motivation and research to examine the results of actions in the real world. The lessons in each module will give you the tools you need to gain insights from what you read and to use your knowledge in creative and analytical writing. to communicate with real conviction.

English II
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
English I

Join us in English II to see how the human experience -- real life, your life -- is the foundation of the best stories, plays, poems, films, and articles. In each unit of the course, we explore a specific aspect of the human experience such as Laughter, Obstacles, Betrayal, and Fear. Through the study of literature, nonfiction, and life, we will explore what it means to be human, what it means to be fulfilled, triumphant, empowered, and transformed.

English III
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
English I and II

In this course, students will acquire the language, reading, writing, and speaking/listening skills necessary for success in college, career, and beyond. Students will become critical readers and thinkers as they dive deeply into the texts presented throughout this course. Students will learn how to effectively research and integrate their findings, as well as cite their sources.

English IV
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
English I and II

Why do people do what they do? English IV you will give you a front row seat to study of the motives that have driven people's actions for centuries. Along the way you will encounter epic heroes defying danger, tormented minds succumbing to the power of greed and ambition, enlightened thinkers striving for individual rights and freedoms, sensitive souls attempting to capture human emotion, and determined debaters taking a stand on critical issues. You will read to analyze the way language is used to express human motivation and research to examine the results of actions in the real world.? The lessons in each module will give you the tools you need to gain insights from what you read and to use your knowledge in creative and analytical writing.

AP English Language & Composition
1.00 Credit

The AP Language and Composition course will provide high school students with college level instruction in studying and writing various kinds of analytic or persuasive essays on literary and nonliterary topics in language, rhetoric and expository writing. Students will become skilled readers of prose written in various periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. Both their reading and writing should make students aware of the interactions among a writer's purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way writing conventions and language contribute to effectiveness in writing.

AP English Literature & Composition
1.00 Credit

For a year, participate in an AP upscale dining experience in the AP Literature and Composition course. Students act as food critics of exquisite literary cuisine. Menu items include reading, analyzing, writing, rewriting, and discussing creations by the master chefs, renowned authors. With intensive concentration on composition skills and on authors' narrative techniques, this dining experience equips students with recipes for success in college, in a career and the AP exam.

Honors English I, II, III and IV
1.00 Credit

All of our core English classes also have Honors versions available, too.

Exploring Literature
0.50 Credit

This is a literary criticism course ("lit crit"). Lit crit is just the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. We study literature. Discuss literature. Evaluate literature. And interpret literature. So, what's the point? Why do we even study literary criticism? Because it's like taking a magnifying glass to a story (any kind of story - movie, novel, short story, poem, etc.) and dissecting it in order to decide which kind of critique will bring out the best possible qualities and lessons from that story.

Journalism
0.50 Credit

Understanding the role of the free press in America helps students to be better informed and more able to analyze media. In this course, students explore the history of journalism in the United States from its inception in the colonies and its key role in the 1st Amendment, all the way up to present-day issues regarding right to know and the changing landscape of journalistic media in the 21st century. Students acquire the skills and information needed to actively participate in the consumption, analysis, and creation of news media and have the opportunity to investigate the constantly evolving career opportunities within the field of journalism.

Gothic Literature
0.50 Credit
Prerequisites: 
English I and English II

Gothic Literature: Monster Stories

Course Description:
From vampires to ghosts, these frightening stories have influenced fiction writers since the 18th century. This course will focus on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrate how the core writing drivers produce, for the reader, a thrilling psychological environment. Terror versus horror, the influence of the supernatural, and descriptions of the difference between good and evil are just a few of the themes presented. By the time students have completed this course, they will have gained an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of dark fiction.

Note: You can find free text online and audio files for all three novels and for the two Poe stories at http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/ .

Lord of the Rings
0.50 Credit

Lord of the Rings: An Exploration of the Films & Their Literary Influences
The Lord of the Rings is one of the most popular stories in the modern world. In this course, you will study the movie versions of J.R.R. Tolkein's novel and learn about the process of converting literature to film. You will explore fantasy literature as a genre and critique the three Lord of the Rings films.

Mythology
0.50 Credit

Mighty heroes. Angry gods and goddesses. Cunning animals. Mythology and folklore have been used since the first people gathered around the fire as a way to make sense of humankind and our world. This course focuses on the many myths and legends woven into cultures around the world. Starting with an overview of mythology and the many kinds of folklore, the student will journey with ancient heroes as they slay dragons and outwit the gods, follow fearless warrior women into battle and watch as clever animals outwit those stronger than themselves. They will explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore, and see how they are still used to shape society today.

Public Speaking
0.50 Credit

Are you interested in becoming a more effective speaker, overcoming shyness, preparing for further schooling or a career, or just learning more about what public speaking is? If so, this course is for you! Learn about the history and elements of public speaking and rhetoric and the practice of public speaking, from research to performance. While this course is heavy on the theoretical aspects of public speaking and will require answering text and discussion questions, it will also involve evaluating actual speeches, working collaboratively, taking part in class presentations, and writing and presenting a speech. A working mic and camera are a must!

Reading Lab
0.25 Credit

For struggling students; you work on what you need help with the most. Can be taken up to 4 times.

Pre-Algebra
1.00 Credit

For those students needing a slower approach at learning Algebra. This course will be held in Acellus, a different website than Brain Honey. A recommendation from the teacher or guidance counselor is needed.

Algebra 1
1.00 Credit

Algebra I is the foundation! The skills you'll acquire in this course contain the basic knowledge you'll need for all your high school math courses. Relax! This stuff is important, but everyone can do it. Everyone can have a good time solving the hundreds of real-world problems that are answered with algebra. Each module in this course is presented in a step-by-step way right on your computer screen. You won't have to stare at the board from the back of a classroom. There are even hands-on labs to make the numbers, graphs and equations more real. It's all tied to real-world applications like sports, travel, business and health. This course is designed to give you the skills and strategies for solving all kinds of mathematical problems. It will also give you the confidence that you can handle everything that high school math has in store for you. This class is taken over 4 quarter and earns 2 high school math credits when completed.

Algebra 2
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Geometry

This course connects algebra to the real world. It also demystifies algebra, making it easier to understand and master. The goal is to create a foundation in math that will stay with you throughout high school.

Geometry
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Geometry 1

One day in 2580 B.C., a very serious architect stood on a dusty desert with a set of plans. His plans called for creating a structure 480 feet, with a square base and triangular sides, using stone blocks weighing two tons each. The Pharaoh wanted the job done right. The better our architect understood geometry, the better were his chances for staying alive. Geometry is everywhere, not just in pyramids. Engineers use geometry to bank highways and build bridges. Artists use geometry to create perspective in their paintings, and mapmakers help travelers find things using the points located on a geometric grid. Throughout this course, we'll take you on a mathematical highway illuminated by spatial relationships, reasoning, connections, and problem solving. This course is all about points, lines and planes. Just as importantly, this course is about acquiring a basic tool for understanding and manipulating the real world around you.

AP Calculus AB
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Before studying calculus, all students should complete four year s of secondary mathematics designed for college-bound students: courses in which they study algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and elementary functions.

An interactive text, graphing software and math symbol software combine with the exciting on-line course delivery to make Calculus an adventure. This course is designed to prepare the student for the AP Calculus AB exam given each year in May. With continuous enrollment, students can start the course and begin working on Calculus as early as spring of the previous year.

AP Calculus BC
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
AP Calculus AB

An interactive text, graphing software and math symbol software combine with the exciting on-line course delivery to make Calculus an adventure. This course is designed to prepare the student for the AP Calculus BC exam given each year in May. With continuous enrollment, students can start the course and begin working on Calculus as early as spring of the previous year.

AP Statistics
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Algebra II

Statistics are used everywhere from fast food businesses ordering hamburger patties to insurance companies setting rates to predicting a student's future success by the results of a test. Students will become familiar with the vocabulary, method, and meaning in the statistics which exist in the world around them. This is an applied course in which students actively construct their own understanding of the methods, interpretation, communication, and application of statistics. Each unit is framed by enduring understandings and essential questions designed to allow students a deep understanding of the concepts at hand rather than memorization and emulation. Students will also complete several performance tasks throughout the year consisting of relevant, open-ended tasks requiring students to connect multiple statistical topics together.

Honors Algebra 1
1.00 Credit
Honors Geometry
1.00 Credit
Money Skills Math
0.25 Credit

MoneySKILL is a high school course that covers the content areas of income, expenses, saving and investing, credit, and insurance. It is divided into 36 modules which are previewed and explained by the teacher, after which the student views the material and answers ten content questions on each module. The course ends with a final exam on all 36 lesson modules

Pre-Calculus
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Algebra 1 and 2 and Geometry

Students, as mathematic analysts, investigate how advanced mathematics concepts are used to solve problems encountered in operating national parks. As students venture from algebra to trigonometry, they analyze and articulate the real-world application of these concepts. The purpose of this course is to study functions and develop skills necessary for the study of calculus. This course includes algebra, analytical geometry, and trigonometry.

Trigonometry
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus

Course Rationale: This course will develop the student’s mathematical concepts, improve logical thinking, and help to promote success. The course is offered for the students who desire to continue their study of mathematics. The course is needed for the students who wish to continue their education beyond high school in those fields that require a solid background in mathematics.
Course Description: Student will study relations, functions, graphs, trigonometry, polar coordinates, complex numbers, limits, and derivatives. The student will analyze and graph mathematical functions. There is an emphasis on verification of trigonometric identities using all of the basic trigonometric identities. Students will use graphing calculators in activities that are appropriate to the topics being studied.

Calculus (A and B)
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre Calculus or Trigonometry

Students in this course will walk in the footsteps of Newton and Leibnitz. An interactive text and graphing software combine with the exciting on-line course delivery to make calculus an adventure. The course includes a study of limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration of algebraic, trigonometric, and transcendental functions, and the applications of derivatives and integrals.

Integrated Math
1.00 Credit

This course will review some of the fundamental math skills you learned in middle school, and then get you up to speed on the basic concepts of algebra. This course will be taught as a "blended" course. Students from the Grantsburg High School will be attending simultaneously as the teacher works with both traditional and online learners. Pre-approval is necessary to take this course. Call Mr. Beesley, Mr. Bettendorf, or Mr. Mark Johnson for more information.

Math Lab
0.25 Credit

For struggling math students; you work on what you need help with the most. Can be taken up to 4 times.

Health and Personal Wellness
0.50 Credit

Required Health class

Fitness Fundamentals 1
1.00 Credit

Teaches students how to do PE online.

Personal Fitness
0.50 Credit
Walking Fitness
0.50 Credit
Art around the World
0.50 Credit

This course has been especially designed for iForward students in order to offer experiences that will help them better understand cultures throughout our world. This course allows students to work collaboratively with other learners that represent the diverse cultures that make up our incredible planet. Students who enroll in this class will learn skills in mutual respect while gaining a better understanding of other cultures and building respect for varied languages. Learners will gain a valuable awareness by enrolling in Art around the World as it will enable them to develop a well-informed world view through producing arts and crafts from a variety of different cultures.
This course is written for both middle school and high school students so that students at both levels of learning will succeed. Lessons will address similar standards but will allow several pathways for iForward students.

Art is for Everyone
0.50 Credit

Would you love to take an art course but feel that you may not be artistic enough? Well, this is the class for you! This exciting project based course helps students understand that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Students learn to accept the fact that the people we meet will often have a difference of opinion and that fact truly will enrich your life. When this course is completed you probably won’t be a famous artist. However, this course will offer you many opportunities for self-expression. You will increase your potential for creative thinking while you are exposed to a number of careers where art skills are valued. (There are a short list of materials that you might need inside the course.) Students who enroll in this course will gain a deeper respect for all that is beautiful while understanding that there are countless careers, that you can choose from, where creative thinking and art talent are valued.

Cellphone Photography
0.50 Credit

We carry our cell phones everywhere we go and most of them have a built in camera feature that allows us to take instant images of our life as it happens... This class will explore the cell phone as an instant, and available, medium in the art of digital photography. Instruction will expose students to a whole new art form through their cell phone photography. Using cell phone camera as the equipment of choice, along with photo editing programs, students will create unique images based on their everyday lives that will be presented as an artistic visual diary. Students’ skills will be fine-tuned with a better understanding of successful compositions in photographic design. Learners will apply new knowledge and skills to photo retouching and manipulation and using images shot with their personal cell phones. Become part of this emerging media in the area of photography. Enroll in, “The Artistic Side of Cell Phone Photography!”

Graphic Design C2C
0.50 Credit

Graphic Design is all around you from the old shirt you pulled out of your dresser this morning to the billboard that was just put up along the highway. In this course, you will become the artist that creates these designs! You will have the opportunity to combine both Art and Technology to communicate your own ideas!
In this introductory course you will edit images, design logos, and even design a poster for your favorite band while learning to recognize the effects that design has on our society. Learn fundamental skills of graphic design while making choices that are sure to enhance other areas of your learning and your life.
This course is written for both middle school and high school students so that students at both levels of learning will succeed. Lessons will address similar standards but will allow several pathways for iForward students.

Lights, Camera, Action
0.50 Credit

This project-based course will offer a progressive set of lessons which will exposes learners to basic video and animation processes that build on important principles of art. Learners will work independently while learning specific skills, as well as, enjoy a collaborative learning atmosphere with their classmates. Students will be given multiple opportunities to demonstrate their understanding through the creation of short films. This course will introduce students to stop motion animation, videography, basic animation using GIMP, and the lost art of roto-scoping. Students enrolled in this course will explore video production processes while enjoying an original and energetic curriculum that will inspire patience, responsibility, organizational skills, collaboration and a work place level discipline. Students will need a digital camera or cell phone that has video making capabilities and access to GIMP, a free online graphic design program that comes preloaded on school computers or can be safely loaded with instruction from your teacher.

Independent Study: Performing Arts - Art
0.50 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Teacher Permission

This is a unique independent study art course that is set aside for students who have artistic talent and a deep interest in any area of the visual arts. Students who enroll in this course often have the high potential of going into a career in the area of visual arts in the future. Students who wish to enroll in this course will have to have successfully completed an art course with a grade of B or higher. This class will allow students to focus on an area of visual arts that they are passionate about. Learners in this course will design their own course by writing their own short and long term goals and meeting them independently with minimal guidance from their instructor. Students must be committed to daily live lessons! Learners will be highly organized and dedicated to the value of visual arts in their lives and will have to create a blog (or other social media format) where their work can be displayed and shared. Please contact your student guidance counselor to find out if you are a good candidate for this original course.

2D Art - Comic Book Exploration
0.50 Credit

Where do superheroes come from? They live in the action-filled pages of comic books. Who gives them their superpowers? It?s the creative artist who puts energy and excitement into every drawing. In this course, students learn how to create superheroes and discover the power in their pencils. Students learn the tools, tricks, and techniques of how professional artists create people and objects that leap off the page. Students begin with a sketchbook to learn how to visualize ideas and communicate those ideas using lines, colors, composition, and perspective. The end result is a portfolio of the student?s original artwork. In this one-segment course, students investigate the creative processes used by all artists; learn how to analyze, interpret, and evaluate art; and create portfolios of work that demonstrate their own skill and creativity as artists. To be successful in the course, students will need access to a scanner or a digital camera and basic art supplies.

ACT Prep
0.50 Credit

Helps students getting ready to take the ACT exam.

Career Planning
0.50 Credit

Students use an informative interactive process to explore career and life options in this one-semester elective. They begin with a thorough examination of their own interests, aptitudes, achievements, and personality styles. Instructional material then helps them match job market information, interview techniques, training requirements, and educational paths to potential careers that suit their strengths and personal priorities. Successfully completing this course gives students the ability to identify and describe their personal interests, aptitudes, and lifestyle goals; locate and evaluate information about different careers; identify the skills and knowledge needed for careers of interest and how to obtain them; and create an entrepreneurial business plan.

Computer Fundamentals
1.00 Credit

In this introductory course, students will become familiar with the basic principles of a personal computer, including the internal hardware, the operating system, and software applications. Students will gain practice in using key applications such as Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint as well as understand social and ethical issues around the Internet, information and security. In the first semester, the focus is on the fundamentals, learning and using the applications, and understanding the basic roles and responsibilities of the software, hardware an operating system. In the second semester, the focus is on gathering and analyzing data, and using the right tools and methods to collect and present data.

Computer Programming with Java
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Algebra

Computer Programming with Javascript I
The course provides an introduction to computer science and teaches the foundations of computer science and basic programming, with an emphasis on helping students develop logical thinking and problem solving skills. This quarter introduces the student to Javascript and starts to develop computational thinking.

Computer Programming with Javascript II
This is a continuation to the first quarter class builds on previous knowledge of Javascript and focuses more on problem solving. Once students complete both quarters of the CodeHS Introduction to Computer Science course, they will have learned material equivalent to a semester college introductory course in Computer Science and be able to program in JavaScript.

Digital Information Technology
0.50 Credit

This new and exciting course will provide students with the foundational skills needed for exciting careers like game development, military defense, web design, and software engineering. Students will explore Microsoft Office online applications, web design, emerging technologies, operating systems, project management, communication methods, Information Technology careers, and much more.

Financial Literacy
0.50 Credit

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the essential understandings about managing their money. The focus will be on sources of personal income, saving, and spending patterns. Students will learn such things as how to budget, how to make large purchases, how to invest, and how to minimize taxes. Major Concepts Consumers Budgeting Financial Institutions Personal Finance Personal Credit Online banking Identity Theft Stocks and Mutual Funds Retirement Planning Insurance College Funding.

Game Design
0.50 Credit
Prerequisites: 
Algebra

This course will introduce students to the basic skills necessary for game design. They will study the various games in the industry and analyze their approach in terms design and development. The student will explore the processes and art of making game elements like story, levels, sound, user interfaces, and levels. This analysis will include an orientation to the gaming market and innovative techniques? impact on it. Finally, the student will merge all these elements into a functional prototype showing their understanding of the game design process.

Hospitality & Tourism
0.50 Credit

With greater disposable income and more opportunities for business travel, people are traversing the globe in growing numbers. As a result, hospitality and tourism is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. This course will introduce students to the hospitality and tourism industry, including hotel and restaurant management, cruise ships, spas, resorts, theme parks, and other areas. Student will learn about key hospitality issues, the development and management of tourist locations, event planning, marketing, and environmental issues related to leisure and travel. The course also examines some current and future trends in the field.

Sports & Entertainment Marketing
0.50 Credit

Have you ever wished to play sports professionally? Have you dreamed of one day becoming an agent for a celebrity entertainer? If you answered yes to either question, then believe it or not, you've been fantasizing about entering the exciting world of sports and entertainment marketing. Although this particular form of marketing bears some resemblance to traditional marketing, there are many differences as well?including a lot more glitz and glamour! In this course, you'll have the opportunity to explore basic marketing principles and delve deeper into the multi-billion dollar sports and entertainment marketing industry. You'll learn about how professional athletes, sports teams, and well known entertainers are marketed as commodities and how some of them become billionaires as a result. If you've ever wondered about how things work behind the scenes of a major sporting event such as the Super Bowl or even entertained the idea of playing a role in such an event, then this course will introduce you to the fundamentals of such a career.

Techyoself
0.50 Credit

This exciting project based course will take iForward students on an incredible adventure inside the dynamic world of social media while giving them an all-important code of ethics regarding digital citizenship. TYS will inspire growth and connections among students while giving them the skills they need to better understand how technology is changing the way we communicate across the globe. Learners will explore social networking sites, video, blogs, podcasts, ePals and mobile technology. They will get the opportunity to further develop their creative (personal) interests and enhance their understanding of communication, cultures, and relationships. From day one students will exhibit an individual commitment to their future while leaving their virtual footprint on the sunny beach of modern media.

Web Design
0.50 Credit

This one-semester course introduces students to the mechanics and elements of web design and HTML, and the concepts of planning and organizing websites. Students engage in a variety of projectbased assessments to evaluate their understanding and progress. After completing the course, students are able to understand the planning and organization of a website, the elements of design and HTML. Students also learn how to use a WYSIWIG editor and other online tools to create a website.

Spanish 1, Spanish 2, and Spanish 3
1.00 Credit

At iForward, we have a Spanish teacher with live lessons every day in each class. We also offer our students the use of Rosetta Stone in order to become more fluent in speaking and understanding Spanish.

French, German, Latin, Chinese, Japanese
1.00 Credit
Prerequisites: 
English 9

These Foreign Languages are offered through our network of schools (they do not have live lessons). There are these choices:
French I, II, and III
German I, II, and III
Chinese I, II, and III
Japanese I, II, and III

World Foreign Language Exploratory
0.25 Credit

This offers students a chance to look at a foreign language through Rosetta Stone to determine if the language they choose is the right one for them. May be taken all 4 quarters. They must progress to a certain point in Rosetta and also attend live lessons studying a bit of history and culture on the country that speaks the language they chose.

Culinary Arts
1.00 Credit
Driver's Ed
0.25 Credit

Just the written part (no virtual driving).

Financial Literacy
0.50 Credit

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the essential understandings about managing their money. The focus will be on sources of personal income, saving, and spending patterns. Students will learn such things as how to budget, how to make large purchases, how to invest, and how to minimize taxes. Major Concepts Consumers Budgeting Financial Institutions Personal Finance Personal Credit Online banking Identity Theft Stocks and Mutual Funds Retirement Planning Insurance College Funding.

Nutrition
0.50 Credit

This course takes students through a comprehensive study of nutritional principles and guidelines. Students will learn about world-wide views of nutrition, nutrient requirements, physiological processes, food labeling, healthy weight management, diet related diseases, food handling, nutrition for different populations, and more. Students will gain important knowledge and skills to aid them in attaining and maintaining a healthy and nutritious lifestyle.

Real World Parenting
0.50 Credit

Parenting involves more than having a child and providing food and shelter. Learn what to prepare for, what to expect, and what vital steps parents can take to create the best environment for their children. Parenting roles and responsibilities, nurturing and protective environments for children, positive parenting strategies, and effective communication in parent/child relationships are some of the topics covered in this course.

Cosmetology
0.50 Credit

Interested in a career in cosmetology? This course provides an introduction to the basics of cosmetology. Students will explore career options in the field of cosmetology, learn about the common equipment and technologies used by cosmetologists, and examine the skills and characteristics that make someone a good cosmetologist. Students will also learn more about some of the common techniques used in caring for hair, nails, and skin in salons, spas, and other cosmetology related businesses.

Music Appreciation
0.50 Credit

This course covers the history of music and how music developed from ancient times into the music we know today.
This is an interactive course exploring the various composers, historical eras, and genres of music. As you work through the readings, lab explorations, discussions, and thought-provoking questions, you will discover the developments in music throughout time, and will learn how to listen to, talk about, and appreciate music of different times and genres. You will discover the historical background of different styles of music, and how culture and music are intertwined. You will also learn about the lives of some major composers and how their music was affected. This class covers a broad range of topics in quick succession, with units on the Elements of Music, Pop Music, Jazz, Ancient and Medieval Music, the Renaissance era, Baroque era, Classical era, and the Romantic era. Each unit covers the topics with enough depth and breadth to give you a taste of the variety that music offers and encourage you to explore even more!

Performance Studio
0.50 Credit

Private Lessons

Song Writing for Everyone
0.50 Credit

This course will teach students how to write songs in various styles and genres, for various voices and instruments. We will explore the basic elements of song writing, as well as some varied approaches to the process. We will use computer recording and notating technology to record musical ideas. Students will receive basic music theory instruction as related to song writing, and each theory lesson will relate to a musical writing assignment. Students will practice using each technique discussed through creative song writing assignments, and, by the end of the course will write their very own full-length song to share with the class and the world. No previous playing or singing experience is required!

Several Different Courses - Contact your Counselor for More Info
Prerequisites: 
Grade 11 and 12 only with a minimum 3.0 GPA

Youth Options - you take the class and we pay the bill! Earn both high school AND college credit.