English

Cred. Course Title Type Subject Prerequisites
0.50 Creative Writing A Electives English Yes
Prerequisites: English 9

At the beginning of the course, students consider the importance of word play exercises in improving their facility with language while building a compelling and creative writing style. Focusing on word nuances and precision, later lessons guide students to write in a variety of short modes—including poetry, song lyrics, prose poetry, short short stories, and creative nonfiction. There are several opportunities for peer review in this semester, during which students learn best practices for participating in writing workshops, and then revise their work using feedback from their peers

Prerequisites: English 9

At the beginning of the course, students consider the importance of word play exercises in improving their facility with language while building a compelling and creative writing style. Focusing on word nuances and precision, later lessons guide students to write in a variety of short modes—including poetry, song lyrics, prose poetry, short short stories, and creative nonfiction. There are several opportunities for peer review in this semester, during which students learn best practices for participating in writing workshops, and then revise their work using feedback from their peers

0.50 Creative Writing B Electives English Yes
Prerequisites: English 9

This course focuses on longer works of fiction: short stories, plays, and novels. Students learn basic techniques of plot and character development along with strategies for creating suspense and building a theme, and they have opportunities to write in several different genres. Lessons cover a few special topics as well, including graphic novels, animation, comedy, and improvisation. Students apply what they have learned about writing workshops and revising to the longer pieces of writing they create for this semester.

Prerequisites: English 9

This course focuses on longer works of fiction: short stories, plays, and novels. Students learn basic techniques of plot and character development along with strategies for creating suspense and building a theme, and they have opportunities to write in several different genres. Lessons cover a few special topics as well, including graphic novels, animation, comedy, and improvisation. Students apply what they have learned about writing workshops and revising to the longer pieces of writing they create for this semester.

0.50 Creative Writing C: Unleashing the Core of Your Imagination Electives English None
Prerequisites: None

For many hundreds of years, literature has been one of the most important human art forms. It allows us to give voice to our emotions, create imaginary worlds, express ideas, and escape the confines of material reality. Through creative writing, we can come to understand ourselves and our world a little bit better. This course provides students with a solid grounding in the writing process, from finding inspiration to building a basic story to using complicated literary techniques and creating strange hybrid forms of poetic prose and prose poetry. By the end of this course, students will learn how to discover their creative thoughts and turn those ideas into fully realized pieces of creative writing. Completing Creative Writing A and/or B are not required to take this course.

Prerequisites: None

For many hundreds of years, literature has been one of the most important human art forms. It allows us to give voice to our emotions, create imaginary worlds, express ideas, and escape the confines of material reality. Through creative writing, we can come to understand ourselves and our world a little bit better. This course provides students with a solid grounding in the writing process, from finding inspiration to building a basic story to using complicated literary techniques and creating strange hybrid forms of poetic prose and prose poetry. By the end of this course, students will learn how to discover their creative thoughts and turn those ideas into fully realized pieces of creative writing. Completing Creative Writing A and/or B are not required to take this course.

0.50 Exploring Literature Electives English None
Prerequisites: None

Students in Exploring Literature will learn different styles of literary criticism which enable them to approach, discuss, and interpret literature through multiple lenses. As they practice the skills to examine literature from multiple angles, students will learn which techniques will bring out the deepest and most meaningful understanding of stories and poems they read, songs they hear, and even films they watch.

Prerequisites: None

Students in Exploring Literature will learn different styles of literary criticism which enable them to approach, discuss, and interpret literature through multiple lenses. As they practice the skills to examine literature from multiple angles, students will learn which techniques will bring out the deepest and most meaningful understanding of stories and poems they read, songs they hear, and even films they watch.

0.50 Gothic Literature Electives English Yes
Prerequisites: English I and English II

Gothic Literature: Monster Stories Course Description: From vampires to ghosts, these frightening stories have influenced fiction writers since the 18th century. This course will focus on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrate how the core writing drivers produce, for the reader, a thrilling psychological environment. Terror versus horror, the influence of the supernatural, and descriptions of the difference between good and evil are just a few of the themes presented. By the time students have completed this course, they will have gained an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of dark fiction. Note: You can find free text online and audio files for all three novels and for the two Poe stories at http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/ .

Prerequisites: English I and English II

Gothic Literature: Monster Stories Course Description: From vampires to ghosts, these frightening stories have influenced fiction writers since the 18th century. This course will focus on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrate how the core writing drivers produce, for the reader, a thrilling psychological environment. Terror versus horror, the influence of the supernatural, and descriptions of the difference between good and evil are just a few of the themes presented. By the time students have completed this course, they will have gained an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of dark fiction. Note: You can find free text online and audio files for all three novels and for the two Poe stories at http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/ .

0.50 Journalism 2 Electives English None
Prerequisites: None

Understanding the role of the free press in America helps students to be better informed and more able to analyze media. In this course, students explore the history of journalism in the United States from its inception in the colonies and its key role in the 1st Amendment, all the way up to present-day issues regarding "right to know" and the changing landscape of journalistic media in the 21st century. Students acquire the skills and information needed to actively participate in the consumption, analysis, and creation of news media and have the opportunity to investigate the constantly evolving career opportunities within the field of journalism. As students work through each module, they use Web 2.0 tools to respond to current news and shifts in journalism, create original projects, and reflect on the changing face of news. Authentic assessments, interactive examples, and self-checks deepen students' understanding of the topics covered and prepare them for work or further study in the field of journalism. This class is a continuation of Journalism I.

Prerequisites: None

Understanding the role of the free press in America helps students to be better informed and more able to analyze media. In this course, students explore the history of journalism in the United States from its inception in the colonies and its key role in the 1st Amendment, all the way up to present-day issues regarding "right to know" and the changing landscape of journalistic media in the 21st century. Students acquire the skills and information needed to actively participate in the consumption, analysis, and creation of news media and have the opportunity to investigate the constantly evolving career opportunities within the field of journalism. As students work through each module, they use Web 2.0 tools to respond to current news and shifts in journalism, create original projects, and reflect on the changing face of news. Authentic assessments, interactive examples, and self-checks deepen students' understanding of the topics covered and prepare them for work or further study in the field of journalism. This class is a continuation of Journalism I.

0.50 Journalism I Electives English Yes
Prerequisites: English I and English II

Understanding the role of the free press in America helps students to be better informed and more able to analyze media. In this course, students explore the history of journalism in the United States from its inception in the colonies and its key role in the 1st Amendment, all the way up to present-day issues regarding right to know and the changing landscape of journalistic media in the 21st century. Students acquire the skills and information needed to actively participate in the consumption, analysis, and creation of news media and have the opportunity to investigate the constantly evolving career opportunities within the field of journalism.

Prerequisites: English I and English II

Understanding the role of the free press in America helps students to be better informed and more able to analyze media. In this course, students explore the history of journalism in the United States from its inception in the colonies and its key role in the 1st Amendment, all the way up to present-day issues regarding right to know and the changing landscape of journalistic media in the 21st century. Students acquire the skills and information needed to actively participate in the consumption, analysis, and creation of news media and have the opportunity to investigate the constantly evolving career opportunities within the field of journalism.

0.50 Lord of the Rings Electives English Yes
Prerequisites: English I and English II

Lord of the Rings: An Exploration of the Films & Their Literary Influences The Lord of the Rings is one of the most popular stories in the modern world. In this course, you will study the movie versions of J.R.R. Tolkein's novel and learn about the process of converting literature to film. You will explore fantasy literature as a genre and critique the three Lord of the Rings films.

Prerequisites: English I and English II

Lord of the Rings: An Exploration of the Films & Their Literary Influences The Lord of the Rings is one of the most popular stories in the modern world. In this course, you will study the movie versions of J.R.R. Tolkein's novel and learn about the process of converting literature to film. You will explore fantasy literature as a genre and critique the three Lord of the Rings films.

0.50 Media & Communication Electives English Yes
Prerequisites: English I and English II

From banner ads to billboards, newspaper articles, and Facebook feeds, people are constantly sharing ideas. This course looks at the many facets of mass media. Students will learn how the media shapes every aspect of our lives. We examine the role of newspapers, books, magazines, radio, movies, television, and the growing influence of Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

Prerequisites: English I and English II

From banner ads to billboards, newspaper articles, and Facebook feeds, people are constantly sharing ideas. This course looks at the many facets of mass media. Students will learn how the media shapes every aspect of our lives. We examine the role of newspapers, books, magazines, radio, movies, television, and the growing influence of Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

0.50 Mythology Electives English Yes
Prerequisites: English I and English II

Mighty heroes. Angry gods and goddesses. Cunning animals. Mythology and folklore have been used since the first people gathered around the fire as a way to make sense of humankind and our world. This course focuses on the many myths and legends woven into cultures around the world. Starting with an overview of mythology and the many kinds of folklore, the student will journey with ancient heroes as they slay dragons and outwit the gods, follow fearless warrior women into battle and watch as clever animals outwit those stronger than themselves. They will explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore, and see how they are still used to shape society today.

Prerequisites: English I and English II

Mighty heroes. Angry gods and goddesses. Cunning animals. Mythology and folklore have been used since the first people gathered around the fire as a way to make sense of humankind and our world. This course focuses on the many myths and legends woven into cultures around the world. Starting with an overview of mythology and the many kinds of folklore, the student will journey with ancient heroes as they slay dragons and outwit the gods, follow fearless warrior women into battle and watch as clever animals outwit those stronger than themselves. They will explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore, and see how they are still used to shape society today.

0.50 Public Speaking: Finding Your Voice Electives English None
Prerequisites: None

If you've learned the basics and are ready to expand your public speaking skills, Public Speaking 1b: Finding Your Voice is for you. In this course, you'll master the fundamentals of public speaking through practice and eventually learn to speak confidently in front of large groups. Explore the use of inductive and deductive reasoning, learn how to prepare a speech outline, and discover how to write your own speech using correct and emotive language. This course will also help you to develop self-efficacy and self-esteem, reduce your fear of public speaking, and teach you how to use body language effectively. You'll also learn how to stand back and critically examine your own work in order to identify areas for improvement.

Prerequisites: None

If you've learned the basics and are ready to expand your public speaking skills, Public Speaking 1b: Finding Your Voice is for you. In this course, you'll master the fundamentals of public speaking through practice and eventually learn to speak confidently in front of large groups. Explore the use of inductive and deductive reasoning, learn how to prepare a speech outline, and discover how to write your own speech using correct and emotive language. This course will also help you to develop self-efficacy and self-esteem, reduce your fear of public speaking, and teach you how to use body language effectively. You'll also learn how to stand back and critically examine your own work in order to identify areas for improvement.

0.50 Public Speaking: Introduction Electives English None
Prerequisites: None

Does the thought of speaking in front of people makes you break out in hives? Maybe you want tips on how to make that first great impression? In both cases, Public Speaking 1a: Introduction may be just what you need. In this course, you will learn from famous orators, like Aristotle and Cicero, understand the influence of rhetoric, and discover how to recognize bias, prejudice, and propaganda. You will also learn how to plan a speech, build an argument, and communicate effectively, while collaborating with others. Grab your notes and get ready to conquer public speaking!

Prerequisites: None

Does the thought of speaking in front of people makes you break out in hives? Maybe you want tips on how to make that first great impression? In both cases, Public Speaking 1a: Introduction may be just what you need. In this course, you will learn from famous orators, like Aristotle and Cicero, understand the influence of rhetoric, and discover how to recognize bias, prejudice, and propaganda. You will also learn how to plan a speech, build an argument, and communicate effectively, while collaborating with others. Grab your notes and get ready to conquer public speaking!

0.25 Reading Lab: Intensive Reading Intervention Electives English Yes
Prerequisites: None

For struggling students; you work on what you need help with the most. Can be taken up to 4 times. Daily attendance is required and there is no homework with this class. Contact your school counselor for enrolling.

Prerequisites: None

For struggling students; you work on what you need help with the most. Can be taken up to 4 times. Daily attendance is required and there is no homework with this class. Contact your school counselor for enrolling.

0.50 Theater, Cinema, & Film Production Electives English Yes
Prerequisites: English I and English II

Lights! Camera! Action! Let's explore the enchanting world of live theater and its fascinating relationship to the silver screen. In Theater, Cinema, and Film Production, you will learn the basics of lighting, sound, wardrobe, and camerawork while examining the magic that happens behind all the drama. Delve into the glamorous history of film and theater, and examine the tremendous influence these industries have had on society and culture over the years. During this unit, you will discuss and analyze three classic American films Casablanca, Singin' in the Rain, and The Wizard of Oz to help you learn how to critique and appreciate some of the most famous dramas of all time. Materials Standard editions of the three films used in this course: Singin’ in the Rain (1952), Wizard of Oz (1932), Casablanca (1942)

Prerequisites: English I and English II

Lights! Camera! Action! Let's explore the enchanting world of live theater and its fascinating relationship to the silver screen. In Theater, Cinema, and Film Production, you will learn the basics of lighting, sound, wardrobe, and camerawork while examining the magic that happens behind all the drama. Delve into the glamorous history of film and theater, and examine the tremendous influence these industries have had on society and culture over the years. During this unit, you will discuss and analyze three classic American films Casablanca, Singin' in the Rain, and The Wizard of Oz to help you learn how to critique and appreciate some of the most famous dramas of all time. Materials Standard editions of the three films used in this course: Singin’ in the Rain (1952), Wizard of Oz (1932), Casablanca (1942)

0.50 Writing Lab: Intensive Reading and Writing Intervention Electives English Yes
Prerequisites: None

This class will help struggling writers learn to write effective paragraphs and essays. It is a small group class so students have lots of support. This class should be taken for a whole semester. It is part of the RTI program to help students become better writers. Contact your school counselor to enroll in this class. Daily attendance is required and there will be some work required outside of class.

Prerequisites: None

This class will help struggling writers learn to write effective paragraphs and essays. It is a small group class so students have lots of support. This class should be taken for a whole semester. It is part of the RTI program to help students become better writers. Contact your school counselor to enroll in this class. Daily attendance is required and there will be some work required outside of class.